How do you choose a SSD?

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Re: How do you choose a SSD?

Post#61 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 7:04 pm

DavidinCT wrote: It even helped with the Movie Library, it loads so much quicker (Meta data and pictures) than it did before. The movies are all on 2 other drives.

A few months ago I swapped my OS drive to a Samsung EVO 840. I moved my media files to another drive, then used the Samsung utility for the OS transfer and everything went flawlessly. The on screen channel guide, movie guide, and recorded TV listings are much faster now, in fact they are nearly instantaneous. It seems as though the animations are the limiting factor. With my HDD, I would sometimes have to wait many seconds for information to show up - it was so bad, I would count to 30 and then quit out of media center thinking it had frozen or crashed.

I used the Samsung software to benchmark all my HDDs and my SSD. Obviously the SDD has superior performance, but my old 1TB OS HDD ended up with very poor performance compared to my 3TB storage HDD. So it seems that I replaced an exceptionally bad HDD with a SDD.
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Post#62 » Thu Feb 26, 2015 12:27 am

A while back I had an opportunity to test an 840 EVO (I was considering getting the Pro), and I already have an Intel X25-V. I expected to see the Samsung drive outperform the Intel drive since there is such a large gap in time between their release dates and the benchmarks I read were so different, but when it came down to real-world performance, both drives performed almost identically. I even performed my own benchmarks, and they were miles apart, but that sure didn't translate into much of a real-world performance boost.
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Post#63 » Fri Feb 27, 2015 12:22 pm

richard1980 wrote:A while back I had an opportunity to test an 840 EVO (I was considering getting the Pro), and I already have an Intel X25-V. I expected to see the Samsung drive outperform the Intel drive since there is such a large gap in time between their release dates and the benchmarks I read were so different, but when it came down to real-world performance, both drives performed almost identically. I even performed my own benchmarks, and they were miles apart, but that sure didn't translate into much of a real-world performance boost.

My experience was similar, moving from a mirror set of two 10k drives with no sleep settings to an SSD offered little real-world performance boost in day to day usage. It did speed up boot time, quieted the system down, and My Movies is somewhat better, but application use, guide use, and scrolling didn't change almost at all. I had hoped for me, but 10k drives are already pretty quick in random access, especially a RAID 1 array which has two independent actuator arms to service two read requests at once. I basically did the changeover because the SSD was cheap, and for SAF. :)
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Post#64 » Fri Feb 27, 2015 12:58 pm

To be clear, I compared two SSDs (Samsung 840 EVO vs Intel X25-V), not HDD vs SSD. I definitely noticed a performance boost when I switched from HDD to SSD.
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Post#65 » Wed Apr 29, 2015 5:38 pm

richard1980 wrote:To be clear, I compared two SSDs (Samsung 840 EVO vs Intel X25-V), not HDD vs SSD. I definitely noticed a performance boost when I switched from HDD to SSD.


Oh, yea, it's almost like night and day.... When I removed the old 60gb oZ SSD for a larger one in my WMC, I took the old one and put it in a OLD HP netbook (one of those Adam CPUs from about 4-5 years ago, came with WIn 7 starter), this thing was always slow as crud and almost unusable for web browsing or anything. It make a huge difference in performance and it make it actually very usable and shockingly fast for that old computer.

If your MC machine is starting to get a little sluggish, no question a SSD will make a noticeable difference...
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Post#66 » Tue Jan 12, 2016 3:13 pm

How do you change from IDE to AHCI after Windows is installed.

This tutorial is for those who have advanced knowledge in computer, who can alter BIOS settings (and understands what BIOS is, regedit is). If you’ve installed windows 7 in IDE mode and for some reason, you want to switch it to AHCI mode. If you just go into your system BIOS settings and alter the settings to AHCI mode there, when you boot, your computer might fail to start successfully. This happens because you changed IDE to AHCI or vice -versa. Hence if you’ve landed in such a problem, just revert back to IDE and follow this guide here to successfully change to AHCI mode. This tutorial is also useful for those who have just added SSD to their system and want to change the mode to AHCI for better performance as AHCI offers native command queuing support and Hot plugging which improves performance in multi-tasking environment.

Before going ahead with this tutorial, first verify if your system is running in IDE or AHCI Mode.. To check this, go to Check if AHCI mode is on . If You’re not on AHCI, then follow this tut to successfully move to AHCI.
◾Press windows key + r button on keyboard and type regedit and hit on Ok.
◾Now in the left side, expand HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE – System – CurrentControlSet – Services – msahci.
◾In the right pane, right click on Start – Modify.
◾In the value box, type 0 (Default is 3). Ok . It is zero not alphabet o.
◾Close Registry editor. Restart
◾Enter BIOS settings (Default button for BIOS Setting for many systems is – Press F2 repeatedly when you power your system).
◾Change it to AHCI mode and then save changes and exit BIOS.
◾Start the computer/laptop again.
◾Done

You’ll be able to successfully boot into windows without getting windows startup errors or any such kind of windows boot errors. You must do the change in regedit as well as in BIOS, failing which will cause boot problems. If you land into boot problems, just change the bios setting back to IDE and troubleshoot errors. This tutorial works for most of the system but you might be exception so make sure you’ve backup all your important data in case your windows fails to boot. We’ve already cautioned in the start of this article that this is to be followed by those who know what they’re doing.

copied from http://techotv.com/switch-ide-ahci-mode-after-installing-windows/
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